Daily Archives: April 15, 2011

Thirty Days’ Prayer to Mary

Ever glorious and Blessed Mary,
Queen of Virgins, Mother of mercy,
hope and comfort of dejected and desolate souls,
through that sword of sorrow
which pierced thy Heart whilst thine only Son,
Jesus Christ, our Lord,
suffered death and ignominy on the Cross;
through that filial tenderness
and pure love through that filial tenderness
and pure love He had for thee, grieving in thy grief,
while from His Cross He recommended thee
to the care and protection of His beloved Disciple,
St. John, take pity, I beseech thee,
on my poverty and necessities;
have compassion on my anxieties and cares;
assist and comfort me in all my infirmities and miseries.

Thou art the Mother of mercy,
the sweet consolatrix and refuge
of the needy and the orphan,
of the desolate and the afflicted.

Look, therefore, with pity on a miserable,
forlorn child of Eve,
and hear my prayer;
for since, in just punishment of my sins,
I am encompassed with evils
and oppressed with anguish of spirit,
whither can I flee for more secure shelter,

O amiable Mother of my Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ,
than to thy maternal protection?
Attend, therefore, I beseech thee,
with pity and compassion to my humble and earnest
request.

I ask it through the infinite mercy of thy dear Son,
– through that love and condescension wherewith
He embraced our nature, when,
in compliance with the divine Will,
thou gavest thy consent, and Whom,
after the expiration of nine months,
thou didst bring forth
from the chaste enclosure of thy womb,
to visit this world
and bless it with his presence.

I ask it through the sores of His virginal Flesh,
caused by the cords and whips
wherewith He was bound and scourged
when stripped of His seamless garment,
for which His executioners afterwards cast lots.

I ask it through the scoffs and ignominies
by which He was insulted,
the false accusations and unjust sentence
by which He was condemned to death,
and which He bore with heavenly patience.

I ask it through His bitter tears and bloody sweat;
His silence and resignation;
His sadness and grief of heart.

I ask it through the Blood
which trickled from His royal and sacred Head,
when struck with His sceptre of a reed,
and pierced with the crown of thorns.

I ask it through the excruciating torments He suffered,
when His hands and feet were fastened
with huge nails to the tree of the cross.

I ask it through His vehement thirst,
and bitter potion of vinegar and gall.

I ask it through His dereliction on the cross,
when He exclaimed:
“My God! my God! why hast Thou forsaken me?”

I ask it through His mercy extended to the good thief,
and through His recommending His precious Soul and Spirit
into the hands of His Eternal Father before He expired.

I ask it through the Blood mixed with water,
which issued from His sacred Side,
when pierced with a lance,
and whence a flood of grace and mercy has flowed to us.

I ask it through His immaculate life,
bitter Passion,
and ignominious death on the cross,
at which nature itself was thrown into convulsions,
by the bursting of rocks,
rending of the veil of the temple,
the earthquake,
and the darkness of the sun and the moon.

I ask it through His descent into hell,
where He comforted the Saints of the Old Law with His
presence,
and led captivity captive.

I ask it through His glorious victory over death,
when He arose again to life on the third day,
and through the joy
which His appearance for forty days after gave thee,
His blessed Mother,
His Apostles,
and His Disciples,
when, in thine and their presence,
He miraculously ascended into heaven.

I ask it through the grace of the Holy Ghost,
infused into the hearts of the Disciples,
when He descended upon them in the form of fiery tongues,
and which they were inspired with zeal
for the conversion of the world
when they went forth to preach the Gospel.

I ask it through the awful appearance of thy Son,
at the last dreadful day,
when He shall come to judge the living and the dead,
and the world by fire.

I ask it through the compassion He bore thee in this life,
and the ineffable joy thou didst feel
at Thine Assumption into heaven,
where thou art eternally absorbed
in the sweet contemplation of His divine perfections.

O glorious and ever-blessed Virgin,
comfort the heart of thy suppliant,
by obtaining for me the graces and the favours
which I now most earnestly solicit.

(Here mention your requests)

And as I am persuaded my Divine Saviour honour Thee
as His beloved Mother, to whom He can refuse nothing,
so let me speedily experience
the efficacy of thy powerful intercession,
according to the tenderness of thy maternal affection,
and His filial,
loving Heart,
who mercifully grants the requests and complies
with the desires of those that love and fear Him.

Wherefore, O Most Blessed Virgin,
beside the object of my present petition,
and whatever else I may stand in need of,
obtain for me also of thy dear Son,
our Lord and our God,
a lively faith,
firm hope,
perfect charity,
the contrition of heart,
unfeigned tears of compunction,
sincere confession,
just satisfaction,
abstinence from sin,
love of God and of my neighbour,
contempt of the world,
patience to suffer affronts and ignominies,
nay, even, if necessary,
an opprobrious death itself,
for the love of thy Son,
our Saviour Jesus Christ.
Obtain likewise for me,

O Holy Mother of God,
perseverance in good works,
performance of good resolutions,
mortification of self-will,
a pious conversation through life,
and at my last moment,
strong and sincere repentance
accompanied by such a lively
and attentive presence of mind,
as may enable me to receive
the last Sacraments of the Church worthily,
and to die in thy friendship and favour.

Lastly, obtain, I beseech Thee,
for the souls of my parents,
brethren, relatives,
and benefactors both living and dead,
life everlasting.

Amen.

Advertisements

Hour of Mercy: Psalm 6 Douay Rheims

Domine, ne in furore. A prayer of a penitent sinner, under the scourge of God. The first penitential psalm.

[1] Unto the end, in verses, a psalm for David, for the octave. [2] O Lord, rebuke me not in thy indignation, nor chastise me in thy wrath. [3] Have mercy on me, O Lord, for I am weak: heal me, O Lord, for my bones are troubled. [4] And my soul is troubled exceedingly: but thou, O Lord, how long? [5] Turn to me, O Lord, and deliver my soul: O save me for thy mercy’s sake.

[1] “For the octave”… That is, to be sung on an instrument of eight strings. St. Augustine understands it mystically, of the last resurrection, and the world to come; which is, as it were, the octave, or eighth day, after the seven days of this mortal life: and for this octave, sinners must dispose themselves, like David, by bewailing their sins, whilst they are here upon earth.

[6] For there is no one in death, that is mindful of thee: and who shall confess to thee in hell? [7] I have laboured in my groanings, every night I will wash my bed: I will water my couch with my tears. [8] My eye is troubled through indignation: I have grown old amongst all my enemies. [9] Depart from me, all ye workers of iniquity: for the Lord hath heard the voice of my weeping. [10] The Lord hath heard my supplication: the Lord hath received my prayer.

[11] Let all my enemies be ashamed, and be very much troubled: let them be turned back, and be ashamed very speedily.

I hate subtle attacks far more than overt ones

Surprisingly, Catholic League President Bill Donohue has yet to comment on this, but last night’s episode of _Bones_ contained an attack on Catholicism that was really uncalled for and purely malicious. Donohue has criticized the show before, but usually because of comments made by Temperance Brennan, who is an avowed atheist, and a classic example of “TV Asperger’s,” so the comments she’s made in past episodes could be assigned to her atheism/lack of understanding of human nature, and were often contextually treated as such. Agent Seeley Booth is allegedly Catholic (though he has an out of wedlock child and has been shacking up most of this season) and has usually made some defense of his faith on those occasions, however inadequate. There was the really good episode I blogged about a couple seasons ago, where Booth encountered the spirit of an old friend, but then that was “explained away” by a brain tumor in the season finale (even though there were several things in the episode which clearly indicated it could not have been an hallucination).

That said, what happened last night was gratuitous. The victim in the episode was a cable “documentary” host who went around “debunking myths.” The body gave the appearance of having been eaten by a cryptid known as the “chupacabra,” a three-toothed creature that supposedly eats hearts and drinks blood. The guy was waiting in the woods with a camera and a goat (the alleged chupacabra’s favorite food), in an area that supposedly had chupacabra sightings.

Anyway, in the course of the episode, they show some samples of the guy’s TV show. The sample they show of him at work is a bunch of Hispanic people around a statue of Jesus, and he’s shouting at them that the allegedly miraculous statue is a fraud, that their priest deceived them, and “your priest has been lying to you about everything,” and it shows a hidden camera video of a Catholic priest pouring water into the top of the statue to make it appear to “weep.”

There is no comment about the scene, and weeping statues in Catholicism are thus equated with chupacabras, werewolves, and other _X-Files_ phenomena. . . . The pure gratuity of the scene is the kind of thing that makes it really offensive in my book. It’s one thing when an attack on the Church at least has some bearing in reality and is relevant to the context of the story, but when it’s just a needless jab, and so subtle, I find that really offensive.

Responses:
1) “Weeping statues” and such are in no way an essential or even common part of Catholicism. Indeed, those are the kinds of sensationalistic phenomena the Church generally looks askance at.
2) The scene implies that the Church doesn’t investigate such matters, which she does through local bishops, and the Church very quickly rules out things like fraud and condensation, etc. Yes, many laity often ignore the Church’s guidance or even orders on these subjects, but that is not a statement about Catholicism, and this was nowhere indicated in the show.

Fulton Sheen on Palm Sunday

“It was the month of Nisan. The Book of Exodus ordered that in this month the Paschal Lamb was to be selected, and four days later was to be taken to the place where it was to be sacrificed. On Palm Sunday, the Lamb was chosen by popular acclaim in Jerusalem; on Good Friday He was sacrificed” (Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, Life of Christ., Ch. 33 p. 272).

Bishop Sheen points out that the request for teh donkey (Luke 19:31) embodies the paradox of the Incarnation: “the LORD has need of it.” God humbled himself to share in our humanity. He who has no need, who is “that greater than which nothing can be imagined” chose to have need. “It is sufficient for those who know Him to hear: ‘The Lord hath need of it'” (Life of Christ, Ch. 33, p. 273).

Until this point, Jesus has always discouraged people’s praise and proclamation, commanding them to silence. On Palm Sunday, for the first time, He encourages their celebration. Even the Pharisees acknowledge the world is turning to Jesus.

“His ‘Hour’ had come. It was time now for Him to make the last public affirmation of His claims. He knew it would lead to Calvary, and His Ascension adn the establishment of His Kingdom on earth. Once He acknowledged their praise, then there were only two courses open to the city: confess Him as did Peter, or crucifiy. Either He was their King, or else they would have no king but Caesar” (Life of Christ, Ch. 33, p. 274).

Sheen goes on to discuss the prophecy of Zechariah that Jerusalem’s king would come riding on a donkey. Great conquerers always ride on horseback, “sometimes over the prostrate bodies of their foes” (Life of Christ 274). But Christ comes on an ass.

“How Pilate, if he was looking out of his fortress that Sunday, must have been amused by the ridiculous spectacle of a man being proclaimed as a King, and yet seated on the beast that wa sthe symbol of the outcast[. . . .] If He had entered into the city with regal pomp in the manner of conquerors, He would have given occasion to believe He was a political Messias. But the circumstances He chose validated His claim taht His Kingdom was not of this world. There is no suggestion that this pauper King was a rival of Caesar” (Life of Christ, p. 275).

Conversely, the adoration of the people exceeds that which they might give to a mere King :they give him the adoration of a God.

Discussing the response of Christ to the Pharisees’ complaints (Luke 19:40), Sheen points out, “Stones ar ehard, but if they would cry out, then how much harder must be the hearts of men who woudl not recognize God’s mercy before them” (Life of Christ, p. 276).

(edition is New York: McGraw-Hill, 1958.)