Daily Archives: May 25, 2009

Star Parker on Medicaid and what awaits us with Obamacare:

On average, 40 percent of physicians won’t accept Medicaid patients. . . . In a survey done last year by Merritt Hawkins, a healthcare manpower firm, 65 percent of physicians said reimbursements from Medicaid were less than their costs. . . .
In Washington, D.C., for example, which has the highest incidence of children living in poverty in the country, only 63 percent of surveyed physicians in family practice will accept Medicaid patients.
. . . A study cited by Dr. Scott Gottlieb, a physician and health care expert at the American Enterprise Institute, showed Medicaid patients to be 50 percent more likely to die after heart bypass surgery than patients with private coverage or Medicare.

Star Parker on Medicaid and what awaits us with Obamacare:

On average, 40 percent of physicians won’t accept Medicaid patients. . . . In a survey done last year by Merritt Hawkins, a healthcare manpower firm, 65 percent of physicians said reimbursements from Medicaid were less than their costs. . . .
In Washington, D.C., for example, which has the highest incidence of children living in poverty in the country, only 63 percent of surveyed physicians in family practice will accept Medicaid patients.
. . . A study cited by Dr. Scott Gottlieb, a physician and health care expert at the American Enterprise Institute, showed Medicaid patients to be 50 percent more likely to die after heart bypass surgery than patients with private coverage or Medicare.

Interesting

This is a piece by a guy who claims to a) disllike the traditional Latin Mass and b) dislike kids at Mass, but otherwise pretty much nails the problems of the liturgy.

Have any other Catholics noticed the “dumbing down” & the “jazzing up” of the Mass? It’s terrible. It’s a problem I first noticed in Alabama in the late 90’s & I figured that the Church was just competing with the Southern Baptists for parishioners. Folks in the South think that Catholics are weird & I say… go with it! Don’t conform to to a watered down version of Mass just to blend in. Don’t do it.

"Do as they Say . . . "

We’ve all heard the expression, “Do as I say, not as I do,” referring to hypocrites. Yet the phrase actually derives from a teaching of Jesus, regarding the Pharisees:

“Therefore, do and observe all things whatsoever they tell you, but do not follow their example. For they preach but they do not practice” (Mt 23:3)

After all, Jesus also says,

“I tell you, unless your righteousness surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will not enter into the kingdom of heaven. ” (Mt 5:20).

And, in one of my favorite spots of rarely mentioned Biblical irony:

“While he was at table in [Matthew’s] house, many tax collectors and sinners came and sat with Jesus and his disciples. The Pharisees saw this and said to his disciples, ‘Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and sinners?'” (Mt 9:10-11

Of course, the Pharisees, to say this, have to be at the dinner party themselves.

We’ve all heard about the shocking revelations regarding Church-run institutions in Ireland.

It’s horrible, yes. There’s no excuse for it. The perpetrators should have been punished.

Why didn’t the Church act on allegations? I dunno. Fear, mostly. Fear of stirring up trouble. Fear of causing scandal (ironically). Fear of societal dischord. Fear of deterring vocations. The same fears that are always used to justify compromise with evil.

What does it say about the Catholic faith?

Well, it should say a lot, but what it should not say is that Catholics are more prone to this sort of thing than anyone else.

Look at what goes on in licensed foster homes and DSS institutions. in our wonderful englightened United States.

Read Dickens, or Bronte. Look at the horrors that happened and happen in *all* orphanges, the abuses children have suffered at the hands of day care workers and governesses.

Read C. S. Lewis’s Surprised by Joy (among other autobiographies) and learn of the abuse and homosexuality that ran (run?) rampant in English private boarding schools.

There’s something called Original Sin. I’m often tempted to agree with Calvin that it’s more like total depravity. Life in the “state of nature” is solitary, cruel, brutish and short.

There’s really no way out of it.

Study the saints: how many saints suffered from the rampant corruption in their religious communities?

Then, look at the world *without* Christ. The world was a much more brutish place before Christianity came along.

Under Roman law, a head of household could do just about anything he wanted to to anyone in his household.

Then look at what’s happened in the Twentieth Century when the atheists have gotten power.

If one assumes that people are basically good, which is a lie, one can rightlyl feel indignation about corruption in any institution.

However, once one abandons that naive notion, and accepts the reality of human sinfulness, then one can learn not to look at the faults but rather who offers the best solution to human misery. Then it becomes not, “Look how bad they are,” but “Where do we find our hope?”

But those who attack the Catholic Church are not so much interested in stopping the abuse as they are in stopping the Church. That’s why our government just declared pedophilia to be a legally protected “sexual orientation.”

Otherwise, we’d be seening headlines about huge reports on English boarding schools, or the average public middle school in the U.S.

"Do as they Say . . . "

We’ve all heard the expression, “Do as I say, not as I do,” referring to hypocrites. Yet the phrase actually derives from a teaching of Jesus, regarding the Pharisees:

“Therefore, do and observe all things whatsoever they tell you, but do not follow their example. For they preach but they do not practice” (Mt 23:3)

After all, Jesus also says,

“I tell you, unless your righteousness surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will not enter into the kingdom of heaven. ” (Mt 5:20).

And, in one of my favorite spots of rarely mentioned Biblical irony:

“While he was at table in [Matthew’s] house, many tax collectors and sinners came and sat with Jesus and his disciples. The Pharisees saw this and said to his disciples, ‘Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and sinners?'” (Mt 9:10-11

Of course, the Pharisees, to say this, have to be at the dinner party themselves.

We’ve all heard about the shocking revelations regarding Church-run institutions in Ireland.

It’s horrible, yes. There’s no excuse for it. The perpetrators should have been punished.

Why didn’t the Church act on allegations? I dunno. Fear, mostly. Fear of stirring up trouble. Fear of causing scandal (ironically). Fear of societal dischord. Fear of deterring vocations. The same fears that are always used to justify compromise with evil.

What does it say about the Catholic faith?

Well, it should say a lot, but what it should not say is that Catholics are more prone to this sort of thing than anyone else.

Look at what goes on in licensed foster homes and DSS institutions. in our wonderful englightened United States.

Read Dickens, or Bronte. Look at the horrors that happened and happen in *all* orphanges, the abuses children have suffered at the hands of day care workers and governesses.

Read C. S. Lewis’s Surprised by Joy (among other autobiographies) and learn of the abuse and homosexuality that ran (run?) rampant in English private boarding schools.

There’s something called Original Sin. I’m often tempted to agree with Calvin that it’s more like total depravity. Life in the “state of nature” is solitary, cruel, brutish and short.

There’s really no way out of it.

Study the saints: how many saints suffered from the rampant corruption in their religious communities?

Then, look at the world *without* Christ. The world was a much more brutish place before Christianity came along.

Under Roman law, a head of household could do just about anything he wanted to to anyone in his household.

Then look at what’s happened in the Twentieth Century when the atheists have gotten power.

If one assumes that people are basically good, which is a lie, one can rightlyl feel indignation about corruption in any institution.

However, once one abandons that naive notion, and accepts the reality of human sinfulness, then one can learn not to look at the faults but rather who offers the best solution to human misery. Then it becomes not, “Look how bad they are,” but “Where do we find our hope?”

But those who attack the Catholic Church are not so much interested in stopping the abuse as they are in stopping the Church. That’s why our government just declared pedophilia to be a legally protected “sexual orientation.”

Otherwise, we’d be seening headlines about huge reports on English boarding schools, or the average public middle school in the U.S.

. .. And I missed it. . .

A couple days ago, I started posting about significant events 10 years ago this past weekend, and I just missed what it was all building to.
Yesterday was the tenth annivesary of a miracle.

In 1997, a year after my aortic root replacement, my echo showed two “jets” around the stitches of my artificial valve: blood was shooting back into the heart. The next year, they were worse.

Ten years ago, I was expecting to go to the cardiologist and find out that they were worse.

Instead, he walked in the room after my echo, his jaw open, and said, “They healed. They scarred over.”

So, there’s a miraccle for you.