Daily Archives: January 26, 2009

National Girls and Women in Sports Day is Wednesday, Feb. 4. . . . NGWSD began in 1987 as a day to remember Olympic volleyball player Flo Hyman for her athletic achievements and her work to assure equality for women’s sports. Hyman died of Marfan’s [sic] Syndrome in 1986 while competing in a volleyball tournament in Japan. Since that time, NGWSD has evolved into a day to acknowledge the past and recognize current sports achievements, the positive influence of sports participation, and the continuing struggle for equality and access for women in sports.

From Vatican YouTube: Human Life is Inviolable

Text of Dignitas Personae available on EWTN’s Library

Conference speakers: Pro-Life Bloggers a necessary part of reorganization

The pro-life movement will now depend more than ever on the entrepreneurship of average pro-lifers who harness the power of the Internet, said pro-life experts and bloggers at the Bloggers for Life Conference last Thursday. Speakers at the conference included Sen. Sam Brownback and conservative MEP Nirj Deva, head of the pro-life caucus in the European parliament.
. . .

Blogger Shaun Kenney said that, at a time when the mainstream media refuses to cover pro-life news, blogging “enables the community to start being the leaders themselves.” “The change isn’t going to come from some new organization in Washington,” said Kenney; rather, change is going to come from “those who are able to reach out … through alternative means – namely, new media. It’s free, and it’s effective.” Kenney said pro-life activism should be guided by the principle of “centralized command, decentralized execution.” “We’ve marched from a very narrow drumbeat, and that needs to change,” he said.

Diocese of Charleston News Release on Bishop Guglielmone

And the statement from Msgr. Laughlin

Protestants discover religious life (sort of)

National Girls and Women in Sports Day is Wednesday, Feb. 4. . . . NGWSD began in 1987 as a day to remember Olympic volleyball player Flo Hyman for her athletic achievements and her work to assure equality for women’s sports. Hyman died of Marfan’s [sic] Syndrome in 1986 while competing in a volleyball tournament in Japan. Since that time, NGWSD has evolved into a day to acknowledge the past and recognize current sports achievements, the positive influence of sports participation, and the continuing struggle for equality and access for women in sports.