Daily Archives: January 24, 2009

Sedevacantists tend to also be Feeneyites, and use Fr. Feeney’s interpretation of extra Ecclesiam nulla salus as the grounds for saying that John XXIII and subsequent popes have been heretics.

However, Fr. Feeney was excommunicated on February 4, 1953, during the pontificate of Pope Pius IX. It would seem that sedevacantists had better declare Pope Pius IX heretical, too. Interestingly, like certain Catholics today (ahem, Doug Kmiec), Fr. Feeney insisted that the excommunication should come from the Pope, and ignored it. He was reconciled to the Church in 1972, but, interestingly, did not have to recant his views of salvation..

Vatican is "disappointed" in Obama

Monsignor Rino Fisichella, head of the Pontifical Academy for Life, called Obama arrogant and said that the Vatican’s hopes of his being a virtuous leader are disappointed by his overturning the Mexico City Policy.

Monsignor Elio Sgreccia, also known for being the author of the letter banning unethical vaccines, says, “This deals a harsh blow not only to us Catholics but to all the people across the world who fight against the slaughter of innocents that is carried out with the abortion.”

OK, who’s not watching the Super Bowl?

I was actually tempted to try and watch the Super Bowl, at least halftime, because the trailers
for GI Joe and Transformers 2 are premiering during half time.

However, that didn’t last long, as I remembered one of my biggest objections to professional football.

9 Six days shalt thou labour, and shalt do all thy works. 10 But on the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: thou shalt do no work on it, thou nor thy son, nor thy daughter, nor thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy beast, nor the stranger that is within thy gates. (Ex. 20:9-10, Douai-Rheims).

12 Observe the day of the sabbath, to sanctify it, as the Lord thy God hath commanded thee. 13 Six days shalt thou labour, and shalt do all thy works. 14 The seventh is the day of the sabbath, that is, the rest of the Lord thy God. Thou shalt not do any work therein, thou nor thy son nor thy daughter, nor thy manservant nor thy maidservant, nor thy ox, nor thy ass, nor any of thy beasts, nor the stranger that is within thy gates: that thy manservant and thy maidservant may rest, even as thyself. 15 Remember that thou also didst serve in Egypt, and the Lord thy God brought thee out from thence with a strong hand, and a stretched out arm. Therefore hath he commanded thee that thou shouldst observe the sabbath day. (Deuteronomy 5:12-15).

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

God’s action is the model for human action. If God “rested and was refreshed” on the seventh day, man too ought to “rest” and should let others, especially the poor, “be refreshed.”96 The sabbath brings everyday work to a halt and provides a respite. It is a day of protest against the servitude of work and the worship of money.97 (CCC 2172)

The celebration of Sunday observes the moral commandment inscribed by nature in the human heart to render to God an outward, visible, public, and regular worship “as a sign of his universal beneficence to all.”109 Sunday worship fulfills the moral command of the Old Covenant, taking up its rhythm and spirit in the weekly celebration of the Creator and Redeemer of his people. (CCC 2176)

On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are to refrain from engaging in work or activities that hinder the worship owed to God, the joy proper to the Lord’s Day, the performance of the works of mercy, and the appropriate relaxation of mind and body.123 Family needs or important social service can legitimately excuse from the obligation of Sunday rest. The faithful should see to it that legitimate excuses do not lead to habits prejudicial to religion, family life, and health. (CCC 2185).

Those Christians who have leisure should be mindful of their brethren who have the same needs and the same rights, yet cannot rest from work because of poverty and misery. Sunday is traditionally consecrated by Christian piety to good works and humble service of the sick, the infirm, and the elderly. Christians will also sanctify Sunday by devoting time and care to their families and relatives, often difficult to do on other days of the week. Sunday is a time for reflection, silence, cultivation of the mind, and meditation which furthers the growth of the Christian interior life. (CCC 2186).

Sanctifying Sundays and holy days requires a common effort. Every Christian should avoid making unnecessary demands on others that would hinder them from observing the Lord’s Day. Traditional activities (sport, restaurants, etc.), and social necessities (public services, etc.), require some people to work on Sundays, but everyone should still take care to set aside sufficient time for leisure. With temperance and charity the faithful will see to it that they avoid the excesses and violence sometimes associated with popular leisure activities. In spite of economic constraints, public authorities should ensure citizens a time intended for rest and divine worship. Employers have a similar obligation toward their employees. (CCC 2187)

From Apostolic Letter Dies Domini of John Paul II (5/7/1998):

Until quite recently, it was easier in traditionally Christian countries to keep Sunday oly because it was an almost universal practice and because, even in the organization of civil society, Sunday rest was considered a fixed part of the work schedule. Today, however, even in those countries which give legal sanction to the festive character of Sunday, changes in socioeconomic conditions have often led to profound modifications of social behaviour and hence of the character of Sunday. The custom of the “weekend” has become more widespread, a weekly period of respite, spent perhaps far from home and often involving participation in cultural, political or sporting activities which are usually held on free days. This social and cultural phenomenon is by no means without its positive aspects if, while respecting true values, it can contribute to people’s development and to the advancement of the life of society as a whole. All of this responds not only to the need for rest, but also to the need for celebration which is inherent in our humanity. Unfortunately, when Sunday loses its fundamental meaning and becomes merely part of a “weekend”, it can happen that people stay locked within a horizon so limited that they can no longer see “the heavens”.(7) Hence, though ready to celebrate, they are really incapable of doing so.

In the same way, today I would strongly urge everyone to rediscover Sunday: Do not be afraid to give your time to Christ! Yes, let us open our time to Christ, that he may cast light upon it and give it direction. He is the One who knows the secret of time and the secret of eternity, and he gives us “his day” as an ever new gift of his love. The rediscovery of this day is a grace which we must implore, not only so that we may live the demands of faith to the full, but also so that we may respond concretely to the deepest human yearnings. Time given to Christ is never time lost, but is rather time gained, so that our relationships and indeed our whole life may become more profoundly human.

The “Sunday obligation,” as Catholics so slavishly call it, is not just attendance at Mass. It means giving as much as possible of Sunday to Christ. It also means taking a rest. “The Sabbath is made for man,” after all. (Mark 2:27).

Jesus says that the sabbath law is not broken when we perform works of mercy or *necessary* work. But that carries with it the point that we are supposed to *prepare* for the sabbath to make work as little necessary as possible. The disciples picked grain to eat immediately; they did not cook a seven course meal.

The Church teaches that we can do *necessary* work, especially work that inherently involves compassion. The Catechism even says that a certain degree of leisure activity, specifying restaurants and sports, is permissible, so long as it still permits people to observe the Sabbath.

But how many people go to the golf course or the football stadium instead of church?

How can it be observing the sabbath to participate in a multi-billion dollar industry based upon playing professional sports on Sundays? A game in the backyard is one thing.

People insist that that is how they “rest.” But the point is that they are not participating *others* to rest. The Third Commandment does not just require personal rest; it requires that you let your “servants” rest. Watching professional football on Sunday means that a) the football players are “working.” ALl the team’s support members are “working”. The stadium staff are “working.” The television reporters and crews are “working.” The concession people are “working.”

Likewise, it is one thing to eat on Sunday because there are extenuating circumstances, but to plan to go out to eat on Sunday is requiring people to work on the Sabbath.

Even many ‘Bible belt” states are moving to repeal their Blue Laws. South Carolina has recently made several moves towards taking away people’s right not to work on Sundays.

Every time we participate in shopping, eating out or professional sports on Sundays, we are contributing to the decline of religion in our society. We are making excuses for ourselves and for others not to truly honor the Lord’s Day.

It is a mortal sin to do unnecessary labor, or to make other people do unnecessary labor, on Sundays.

In closing, here’s a short history of the Sabbath from the New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia:

The obligation of rest from work on Sunday remained somewhat indefinite for several centuries. A Council of Laodicea, held toward the end of the fourth century, was content to prescribe that on the Lord’s Day the faithful were to abstain from work as far as possible. At the beginning of the sixth century St. Caesarius, as we have seen, and others showed an inclination to apply the law of the Jewish Sabbath to the observance of the Christian Sunday. The Council held at Orléans in 538 reprobated this tendency as Jewish and non-Christian. From the eight century the law began to be formulated as it exists at eh present day, and the local councils forbade servile work, public buying and selling, pleading in the law courts, and the public and solemn taking of oaths. There is a large body of civil legislation on the Sunday rest side by side with the ecclesiastical. It begins with an Edict of Constantine, the first Christian emperor, who forbade judges to sit and townspeople to work on Sunday. He made an exception in favour of agriculture. The breaking of the law of Sunday rest was punished by the Anglo-Saxon legislation in England like other crimes and misdemeanours. After the Reformation, under Puritan influence, many laws were passed in England whose effect is still visible in the stringency of the English Sabbath. Still more is this the case in Scotland. There is no federal legislation in the United States on the observance of the Sunday, but nearly all the states of the Union have statutes tending to repress unnecessary labour and to restrain the liquor traffic. In other respects the legislation of the different states on this matter exhibits considerable variety. On the continent of Europe in recent years there have been several laws passed in direction of enforcing the observance of Sunday rest for the benefit of workmen.

Habemus Episcopam!!!

Msgr. Robert Guglielmone of Rockville Center, NY, has been named Bishop of Charleston. So far, I can’t find much about him, other than he’s a “great administrator,” which usually means “he’s more concerned about money matters than spiritual ones.”

Here’s his short bio at his current parish.

It’s Official! The SSPX excommunications are lifted!

Now, I’ve studied the SSPX quite extensively, and I do not accept some of their arguments. However, the excommunication of the SSPX has been a black mark on all traditionalists, making us all look like we’re “part of that group.”

Now it doesn’t matter. Says Cardinal Giovannie Battista, Prefect of the Congregation for Bishops:

Based on the faculty expressly granted to me by the Holy Father Benedict XVI, in
virtue of the present Decree, I remit of Bishops Bernard Fellay, Bernard Tissier
de Mallerais, Richard Williamson, and Alfonso de Galarreta the censure of latae
sententiae excommunication declared by this Congregation on July 1, 1988, while
I declare deprived of any juridical effect, from the present date, the Decree
emanated at that time.

I always wondered.

In the past, I’ve done searches for “Judie Brown Fr. Eutenauer Fr. Pavone” and been surprised that this is the only site that comes up with all three names.

I just found out why. For four years, I’ve been misspelling Fr. Thomas Euteneuer’s name.

Photographer finds the beauty in us mutants

Photographer Rick Guidotti goes around the world photographing people with genetic disorders to fight against the horrible stereotypes and prejudices we endure!

God bless him!

Here’s a link to the gallery on his website.

Fr. Euteneuer trashes the Legion of Christ, the National Catholic Register, and

Recently, Tom Hoopes of the National Catholic Register published a column that sounded more like something out of the National Catholic Reporter. The column itself really isn’t *that* bad. I’ve seen many conservative columnists saying similar things to what he says, and they make *some* good points.

But it has ticked a few people off, including Fr. Thomas Euteneuer of Human Life International, .

Fr. Euteneuer’s main objection is that Hoopes calls Obama a “decent man.” Now, I’ve always found it interesting that people will say, “Judge not lest ye be judged,” and then turn around and say, “And, anyway, he’s a good guy” or “he’s a decent guy,” as if that is not, in itself, a judgement.

Nevertheless, I was most interested by this point. Many people keep dismissing the fears of those of us who expect Obama to become our first American tyrant. Hoopes fell in with that group, insisting that there is no reason to fear the president of the United States. Fr. Euteneuer offers the following very interesting response:

Has Mr. Hoopes ever heard of the coercive power of the Attorney General, the
IRS, the FBI or the ATF that viciously persecuted pro-lifers in the previous
pro-abortion administration? I have personally been visited by the two latter
entities, and they are not boy scouts.

(Mary notes that Fr. Euteneuer has apparently not spent much time with boy scouts).

Fr. Euteneuer, having previously clashed with a Legion priest who works for Fox News over the Sean Hannity debacle, says that the Legion of Christ “are now officially part of the problem, not part of the solution”.

I should think they were part of the problem way back when their founder was soliciting homosexual favors from seminarians.

No coverage at all for March for Life, but here’s CNN’s headline story

The Enlightened One has reversed the so-called “Mexico City Policy.”

What is really annoying, RE: my recent post on the euphemism “reproductive health”, is that many sites are using the term “reproductive health” when the Mexico City policy refers *specifically* to abortion. The US has been funding contraception abroad since at least the Kennedy Administration, and it is, of course, the basis of the “how to conquer the world” strategy outlined by Henry Kissinger.

That said, this Time article is quite interesting. I’m surprised I’ve never seen this before. The Left always calls the Mexico City Policy a “gag rule.” I never understood why.
Apparently, it *is* illegal for US taxpayer dollars to fund overseas abortions *directly*.

Under the policy, NGOs that applied for family-planning funds from the U.S.
Agency on International Development (USAID) had to refrain from using any of
their own funds to provide abortion (with exceptions for cases of rape or incest
or to save the life of the mother). The organizations also were not eligible if
they lobbied to make or keep abortion legal in their own country or if they
provided abortion referrals — a requirement that led many opponents of the
policy to dub it a “global gag rule.”

So, that’s kind of interesting.

But this should still be a slap in the face to incrementalists, who have said for decades that “small steps” like Mexico City policy would lead to eventual outlawing of abortion, and every “small step” they’ve made just needs one pro-abortion president with a pro-abortion Congress to step back.

But at least 16 developing nations in Africa, Asia and the Middle East have been
affected, with all NGOs in those countries denied U.S. funding to help provide
contraceptives and other much needed services.

Why are contraceptives “needed services”???

When will people get it in their heads. The US says, “Hey, you unwashed, dark-skinned third world peoples! You need this service! It will keep your population from growing and overtaking us. We’ll even pay for it!”

African American Pastor asks Obama not to preside over "Genocide" of his own race

Pastor Luke Robinson offered the following striking statistic:

“We make up about 12% of the population and about 34% of all abortions are black babies. In the last 36 years over 17 million African American babies have died by abortion alone. We need to change this picture. We need to stop this slaughter of the innocent preborn.”

I recently read the observation somewhere that, prior to the birth control pill, unwed motherhood was almost unheard of in the African American community.

St. Francis did not say, "Make me an instrument of your peace"

The authenticit of atttribution of the “St. Francis Peace Prayer” has always been in doubt. Now, L’Osservatore Romano confirms that it was originally published in the early 20th Century. It was a French prayer, which Benedict XV had published in L’Osservatore Romano because it was such a nice prayer. Then prayer cards were printed with the prayer on one side and St. Francis on the other, leading to the popular belief that St. Francis wrote it.

I always wondered.

In the past, I’ve done searches for “Judie Brown Fr. Eutenauer Fr. Pavone” and been surprised that this is the only site that comes up with all three names.

I just found out why. For four years, I’ve been misspelling Fr. Thomas Euteneuer’s name.

Photographer finds the beauty in us mutants

Photographer Rick Guidotti goes around the world photographing people with genetic disorders to fight against the horrible stereotypes and prejudices we endure!

God bless him!

Here’s a link to the gallery on his website.

The Exodus happened because of "Population Control"

The Egyptians invented contraception.

With that in mind, consider Exodus 1:9-10 (Douay): “Behold the people of the children of Israel are numerous and stronger than we. Come, let us wisely oppress them, lest they multiply: and if any war shall rise against us, join with our enemies, and having overcome us, depart out of the land. “

Now, consider these words by Henry Kissinger in the infamous NSSM-200:

primary emphasis would be placed on the largest and fastest growing developing countries where the imbalance between growing numbers and development potential most seriously risks instability, unrest, and international tensions. These countries are: India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nigeria, Mexico, Indonesia, Brazil, The Philippines, Thailand, Egypt, Turkey, Ethiopia, and Colombia. Out of a total 73.3 million worldwide average increase in population from 1970-75 these countries contributed 34.3 million or 47%. This group of priority countries includes some with virtually no government interest in family planning and others with active government family planning programs which require and would welcome enlarged technical and financial assistance. These countries should be given the highest priority within AID’s population program in terms of resource allocations and/or leadership efforts to encourage action by other donors and organizations.

Sound familiar, if more long-winded?

The US needs access to the resources of third world nations:

Whatever may be done to guard against interruptions of supply and to develop domestic alternatives, the U.S. economy will require large and increasing amounts of minerals from abroad, especially from less developed countries.10 That fact gives the U.S. enhanced interest in the political, economic, and social stability of the supplying countries. Wherever a lessening of population pressures through reduced birth rates can increase the prospects for such stability, population policy becomes relevant to resource supplies and to the economic interests of the United States. . . .
Whether through government action, labor conflicts, sabotage, or civil disturbance, the smooth flow of needed materials will be jeopardized. Although population pressure is obviously not the only factor involved, these types of frustrations are much less likely under conditions of slow or zero population growth. (NSSM-200 Ch. 3)

The US needs to depopulate those nations to make them easy to invade:

The young people, who are in much higher proportions in many LDCs, are likely to be more volatile, unstable, prone to extremes, alienation and violence than an older population. These young people can more readily be persuaded to attack the legal institutions of the government or real property of the “establishment,” “imperialists,” multinational corporations, or other — often foreign — influences blamed for their troubles (NSSM-200, Ch. 5)

Here are some of the alternative “strategies” he suggests (the following several quotations are from NSSM-200 Part 2):

The following areas appear to contain significant promise in effecting fertility declines, and are discussed in subsequent sections.
providing minimal levels of education especially for women;
reducing infant and child mortality;
expanding opportunities for wage employment especially for women;
developing alternatives to “social security” support provided by children to aging parents;
pursuing development strategies that skew income growth toward the poor, especially rural development focussing on rural poverty;
concentrating on the education and indoctrination of the rising generation of children regarding the desirability of smaller family size.

So we’re going to go into religious countries and “indoctrinate” them into our ideology, and we’re going to put women to work.

Now, this part is interesting:

The U.S. can help to minimize charges of an imperialist motivation behind its support of population activities by repeatedly asserting that such support derives from a concern with:
(a) the right of the individual couple to determine freely and responsibly their number and spacing of children and to have information, education, and 1means to do so; and
(b) the fundamental social and economic development of poor countries in which rapid population growth is both a contributing cause and a consequence ofwidespread poverty.

He recognizes that this policy will be seen as imperialistic. He says “we have to avoid that impression.” He has previously talked all about “indoctrination” and other means of coercing these countries to comply.
*Then* he says, “just to make it appear like we’re not imperialistic, we’ll let them think we’re giving them a choice in the matter.”

Then he says that all those suggestions are not enough: “The conclusion of this view is that mandatory programs may be needed and that we should be considering these possibilities now.”

After the suggestions, he lists a number of point to “consider”, including:

On what basis should such food resources then be provided? Would food be considered an instrument of national power? Will we be forced to make choices as to whom we can reasonably assist, and if so, should population efforts be a criterion for such assistance?
Is the U.S. prepared to accept food rationing to help people who can’t/won’t control their population growth?

This is the passage that some refer to as “food genocide”: “If you don’t accept our contraceptives, we won’t give you food.”

NOW THIS IS INTERESTING:
“Improved methods for ovulation prediction will be important to those couples who wish to practice rhythm with more assurance of effectiveness than they now have.”

So, Kissinger actually recommended that the same amount of money be budgeted to NFP research as to research in oral contraceptives and IUDs.

And now, the big one:
“No country has reduced its population growth without resorting to abortion.”

So, he admits here what many “Catholics” deny: that if you’re going to have contraception, you need abortion.

It would be unwise to restrict abortion research for the following reasons:
1. The persistent and ubiquitous nature of abortion.
2. Widespread lack of safe abortion technique.
3. Restriction of research on abortifacient drugs and devices would:
a. Possibly eliminate further development of the IUD.
b. Prevent development of drugs which might have other beneficial uses.
An example is methotrexate (R) which is now used to cure a hitherto
fatal tumor of the uterus — choriocarcinoma. This drug was first used as
an abortifacient.

Here he admits that the IUD is an abortifacient: another fact commonly denied today. (The IUD works by stopping an embryo from implanting in the womb).

Back in 2004, a fellow named Brian Clowes, with Human Life International, wrote a great piece on the 30th Anniversary of the Kissinger Report, along with its dire consequences.
He says in summary form what I quote above.

A few of Clowes’ comments:

While the CIA and Departments of State and Defense have issued hundreds of papers on population control and national security, the U.S. government has never renounced NSSM-200, but has only amended certain portions of its policy. NSSM-200, therefore, remains the foundational document on population control issued by the United States government.

Now, what he says here has been said previously by Pat Buchanan and by many Catholic bishops. However, given today’s economic crisis, which Buchanan and said bishops predicted, let’s look at what Clowes says about the effect of NSSM-200 on the world in 2004:

NSSM-200’s strategies have resulted in regional population growth rates
decelerating so fast that they are already causing severe economic and social
problems in Europe, the former Soviet Union, Japan, Singapore and Hong Kong.
Many developing nations are now aging even more rapidly than the developed
world, which foretells of even more severe problems for their relatively
underdeveloped economies.

Clowes concludes:

NSSM-200 does not emphasize the rights or welfare of individuals or of nations, just the “right” of the United States to have unfettered access to the natural resources of developing nations. The United States and the other nations of the developed world, as well as ideologically motivated population control NGOs, should be supporting and guiding authentic economic development that allows the people of each nation to use their resources for their own benefit, thereby leading to an enhancement of human rights worldwide and healthier economies for all.

A PDF of Clowes’ full scholarly text can be downloaded here.

Clowe’s document was published by HLI as an appeal to our ex “pro-life” President Bush to officially repeal NSSM-200. He did not do so. Why would he? He was already entrenched in a war to conquer a third world nation for its natural resources.

Still think this country is so great and democratic and all that?

No coverage at all for March for Life, but here’s CNN’s headline story

The Enlightened One has reversed the so-called “Mexico City Policy.”

What is really annoying, RE: my recent post on the euphemism “reproductive health”, is that many sites are using the term “reproductive health” when the Mexico City policy refers *specifically* to abortion. The US has been funding contraception abroad since at least the Kennedy Administration, and it is, of course, the basis of the “how to conquer the world” strategy outlined by Henry Kissinger.

That said, this Time article is quite interesting. I’m surprised I’ve never seen this before. The Left always calls the Mexico City Policy a “gag rule.” I never understood why.
Apparently, it *is* illegal for US taxpayer dollars to fund overseas abortions *directly*.

Under the policy, NGOs that applied for family-planning funds from the U.S.
Agency on International Development (USAID) had to refrain from using any of
their own funds to provide abortion (with exceptions for cases of rape or incest
or to save the life of the mother). The organizations also were not eligible if
they lobbied to make or keep abortion legal in their own country or if they
provided abortion referrals — a requirement that led many opponents of the
policy to dub it a “global gag rule.”

So, that’s kind of interesting.

But this should still be a slap in the face to incrementalists, who have said for decades that “small steps” like Mexico City policy would lead to eventual outlawing of abortion, and every “small step” they’ve made just needs one pro-abortion president with a pro-abortion Congress to step back.

But at least 16 developing nations in Africa, Asia and the Middle East have been
affected, with all NGOs in those countries denied U.S. funding to help provide
contraceptives and other much needed services.

Why are contraceptives “needed services”???

When will people get it in their heads. The US says, “Hey, you unwashed, dark-skinned third world peoples! You need this service! It will keep your population from growing and overtaking us. We’ll even pay for it!”